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  About the Service


There are four simple things you need to do to place an order:

          1) Read all the information below including the Patient Information Leaflet.
          2) Select the medicine you want to try.
          3) Create an account and checkout.
          4) Answer all medical questions during checkout before paying and then a doctor will inform you of his decision.

Please read all the information below (sections 1 to 5) before placing an order, it is very important and you must not skip this step.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. In the UK, the number of new diagnoses has been steadily increasing each year since the mid-1990s, and it has now become the most commonly diagnosed STI.

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Once you finish reading all the information on this page, you will find the choices of medicine and prices we charge at the bottom of this page under step 5.
 
  About the condition


Chlamydia


Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. In the UK, the number of new diagnoses has been steadily increasing each year since the mid-1990s, and it has now become the most commonly diagnosed STI.

Chlamydia is called the ‘silent’ disease because most people who get it do not experience any noticeable symptoms. Around 50% of men and 70-80% of women who get the Chlamydia infection will have no symptoms and many cases of Chlamydia remain undiagnosed.

How common is it?

Between 2007 and 2008, the number of confirmed cases of Chlamydia rose from 121,791 to 123,018. Young people under 25 are most likely to be infected, 65% (80,258) of all new Chlamydia diagnoses made in 2008 were in people between the ages of 16 and 24.

Symptoms in Men

Symptoms of genital Chlamydia are more common in men than in women. Signs and symptoms can appear 1-3 weeks after coming in contact with Chlamydia, many months later or not until the infection has spread to other parts of your body.

Some men may notice:
           * a white, cloudy or watery discharge from the tip of the penis,
           * pain when passing urine, or
           * pain in the tesiticles.

Some men experience mild symptoms that disappear after two or three days. However, after the discomfort disappears, you may still have the Chlamydia infection. This means that you can pass it on to a sexual partner and you are at risk of complications such as inflamed and swollen testicles, reactive arthritis and infertility.

Symptoms in Women

In women, genital Chlamydia does not always cause symptoms. Signs and symptoms can appear 1-3 weeks after coming in contact with Chlamydia, many months later or not until the infection has spread to other parts of your body.

Some women may notice:

           * Cystitis (pain when passing urine),
           * a change in their vaginal discharge,
           * lower abdominal pain,
           * pain and/or bleeding during sexual intercourse,
           * bleeding after sex, or
           * bleeding between periods or heavier periods.

If left untreated the Chlamydial infection can spread to the womb, and cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID). PID is a major cause of infertility, ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage.

Symptoms in Both

Very rarely the Chlamydia infection may affect areas other than the genitals in both men and women, such as the rectum, eyes or throat.

If the infection is in the rectum it can cause some discomfort and discharge. In the eyes it can cause pain, swelling, irritation and discharge (conjunctivitis). Infection in the throat is very rare and does not usually cause any symptoms.

Causes of Chlamydia

As Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), it is transmitted (passed on) from one person to another during intimate sexual contact. You can catch Chlamydia through having:
           * unprotected vaginal sex,
           * unprotected anal sex,
           * unprotected oral sex,
           * genital contact with an infected partner, or
           * sharing sex toys if they are not washed or covered with a condom each time they are used.

If infected semen or vaginal fluid comes into contact with the eye, it can cause conjunctivitis.

It is not clear whether Chlamydia infection can be spread by transferring infected semen or vaginal fluid on the fingers or by rubbing female genitals (vulvas) together.

As it is common for someone with the Chlamydia infection not to have symptoms, it is possible for him or her to infect a partner without knowing.

Chlamydia can be passed from a mother to her baby during childbirth. Although no obvious symptoms are immediately apparent, the infection will often develop after birth, and can result in complications such as inflammation and discharge in the baby’s eyes (conjunctivitis) and pneumonia.

Complications if left untreated

Women
In women, if Chlamydia is not treated it can spread to other reproductive organs causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis), fallopian tubes (salpingitis) and Bartholin’s glands (Bartholinitis).

Infection with Chlamydia during pregnancy may also be linked to early miscarriage or premature birth of the baby.

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)
Chlamydial infection is one of the main causes of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women. PID is an infection of the uterus, ovaries and fallopian tubes that can cause infertility, persistent pelvic pain and an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy. The condition can be treated using antibiotics, and early treatment will reduce the risk of infertility. You should avoid having sexual intercourse while receiving treatment for PID.

Cervicitis
Cervicitis is an inflammation of the neck of the womb, the cervix. It often causes no symptoms but you may experience some discomfort, have a vaginal discharge containing pus or irregular bleeding. Some people also experience pain during intercourse and urinary symptoms, such as the need to urinate more often, and a burning pain when they urinate. When left untreated cervicitis causes the cervix to become enlarged and cervical cysts to develop, which may become infected. Chronic (long term) cervicitis can cause backache, deep pelvic pain, and a persistent vaginal discharge.

Salpingitis
Infection with Chlamydia can cause a blockage of the fallopian tubes. This may prevent eggs from passing along, or entering the tubes. Even a partial blockage of the fallopian tubes will increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy occurring. This is when a fertilised egg is implanted outside of the womb, usually in a fallopian tube..Microsurgery can sometimes be used to effectively treat a blockage.

Bartholinitis
The glands that produce the lubricating mucus to make sexual intercourse easier are known as the Bartholin’s glands. They are situated on either side of the vaginal opening. Infection with Chlamydia can cause the glands to become blocked and infected and lead to a Bartholin’s cyst. A cyst is usually painless but if it becomes infected it can lead to a pus-filled Bartholin's abscess. An abscess is usually red, very tender and painful to touch, and can cause a fever. An infected abscess will need to be treated with antibiotics.


Men
Urethritis
Urethritis in men is inflammation of the urethra (the urine tube) that runs along the underside of the penis. Symptoms include a white or cloudy discharge from the tip of the penis, a burning or painful sensation when you urinate, the urge to urinate often and irritation and soreness around the tip of the penis. If left untreated a urethral stricture can occur, this can seriously interfere with the flow of urine and lead to back pressure which can damage the kidneys. Urethritis can be treated with antibiotics.

Epididymitis
Epididymitis is the inflammation of the epididymis, a long tube that connects the testes (where sperm are produced) to the vas deferens (a pair of ducts where sperm collect ready for ejaculation through the urethra). An infected epididymis can become inflamed, causing swelling and tenderness in the affected area of the scrotum. Infection can lead to an accumulation of fluid in the area or even an abscess. If left untreated epididymitis can lead to you becoming infertile.

Reactive arthritis
Reactive arthritis develops as a reaction to an infection, such as Chlamydia. Symptoms include inflammation of the joints (arthritis), the urethra (urethritis) and the eyes (conjunctivitis). Although Chlamydia can sometimes cause inflammation of the joints in women, reactive arthritis is more likely to occur in men. There is no cure for arthritis and although symptoms usually get better in three to 12 months, they can recur after this. Symptoms can be controlled by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibruprofen.

Prevention

Chlamydia can be successfully prevented by:
           * using condoms (male or female) every time you have vaginal or anal sex,
           * using a condom to cover the penis or latex or plastic square (dam) to cover the female genitals if you have oral sex, and
           * not sharing sex toys. If you do share them wash them or cover them with a new condom before anyone else uses them.

These measures can also protect you from other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as genital herpes and gonorrhoea.

If you are worried you may be at risk of having an STI or have any of the symptoms mentioned in the symptoms section, you should visit your local sexual health or GUM clinic to have them checked out.

Treatments

Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics.

Make sure your sexual partner also gets treatment. Otherwise, the treated partner becomes re-infected. Repeated infection can cause far worse fertility problems in women.

Not all antibiotics are effective. There are two major groups of antibiotics that work, so make sure you get one of these.
           * Macrolides: azithromycin (eg Zithromax, Clamelle) is the most convenient treatment because it only requires a single dose (1g).
           * Tetracyclines: the usual prescribed drug is doxycycline (eg Vibramycin). One 100mg capsule should be taken twice a day for a week.

If you have Chlamydia, do what you can to encourage any ex-partners to get tested. This infection can stay unrecognised for months, if not years.

Confidential Chlamydia self-testing


           * Sexually active people should test every year and when they have a new partner.
           * Order a Chlamydia test kit through the post.
           * Post the sample to the lab in the envelope provided.
           * A few days later the result is posted, or emailed back to you.

Important

Cautions
Men who have a thick or bloody discharge from the penis with soreness or inflammation or women with heavy offensive vaginal discharge or irregular bleeding and low abdominal pain should see their regular doctor. Discharge is mucous like fluid coming from the end of the penis, vagina or anus.

Alternative treatment
People under 25 can arrange a test via the National Chlamydia Screening Program. GPs, genito-urinary medicine clinics and some walk-in-centres can provide tests and treatment.
 
  About the Medicine

Treatments

The common treatment for Chlamydia is a course of antibiotics. If taken correctly it is more than 95% effective. The course of antibiotics can be either a single dose, or a longer course of up to two weeks.

If there is a high chance that you have been infected with chlamydia, treatment may be started before you receive your test results. You will always be given treatment if your partner is found to have chlamydia.

The two most commonly prescribed antibiotics to treat chlamydia are:

           * Azithromycin (single dose)
           * Doxycycline (usually two capsules a day for a week)

Other less commonly prescribed antibiotics include Ofloxacin, Amoxicillin and Erythromycin.

It is important that you finish all the capsules prescribed to you. If you do not, the treatment may not be effective at getting rid of the infection.

You can discuss with your GP which antibiotic is the most suitable for you. If you are pregnant, for example, some antibiotics may not be suitable, but alternatives are available. Azithromycin, Amoxicillin and Erythromycin are all suitable for pregnant women..

Antibiotics used to treat Chlamydia may interact with the combined contraceptive pill and the contraceptive patch. If you use these methods of contraception, you can discuss with your GP or nurse which additional contraception is suitable for this time.

Side Effects

The side effects of antibiotics are usually mild, the most common side effects include:
           * stomach pain,
           * diarrhoea, and
           * feeling sick.

Occasionally, Doxycycline can cause a skin rash if you are exposed to too much sunlight (photosensitivity).

Doxycycline

Doxycycline is an antibiotic used to treat Chlamydia infection. It is used mainly as an alternative to the antibiotic azithromycin.

Doxycycline is equally as effective as azithromycin, but whereas azithromycin is a single dose treatment, doxycycline treatment needs to be taken twice daily for 7 days.
           * Avoid sexual contact whilst taking doxycycline and for 7 days afterwards, until no longer infectious.
           * People with a positive Chlamydia test and their sexual partners should be treated, at the same time if possible.
           * Tests take 6 weeks to go negative after Chlamydia has been successfully treated.

Side Effects
The most frequently seen side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and acid type indigestion and heart burn.

Other side effects are rare. Doxycycline can cause light sensitivity. Strong sun and sun beds should be avoided whilst doxycycline is being taken.

For a full list of side effects and information about taking doxycycline, including interactions with other medication, see the patient information leaflet on doxycycline.

Cautions
Doxycycline should not be taken at the same time as antacids or milk as these can reduce absorption.

As with other antibiotics doxycycline can reduce the effectiveness of the contraceptive pill. The pill should not be stopped. Alternative contraception should be used whilst taking doxycycline and for 7 days afterwards.

Azithromycin


           * Avoid any sexual contact for 7 days after taking Azithromycin, until no longer infectious.
           * People with a positive chlamydia test and their sexual partners should be treated at the same time if possible.
           * Chlamydia tests take 6 weeks to go negative after chlamydia has been successfully treated.

Side Effects
Serious side effects are unusual, the most common are stomach upset, nausea and diarrhoea.

For details about azithromycin see the patient information leaflet supplied with the tablets.

In the unlikely event that vomiting occurs within an hour of taking azithromycin the treatment should be repeated.

Dosage

Doxycycline
One 100mg capsule should be taken twice a day for a week.

Azithromycin
A single dose (1g).


Clamelle Test Kit

The Chlamydia test is carried out on a urine sample you collect and post to the laboratory. The test is a standard lab test for Chlamydia and is highly reliable. Results are posted back within 7 days.

Who should tested for chlamydia
You should get tested, whatever your age or sex, in particular if:
           * You are considering starting a family and want to check you have no chlamydial infection that could affect your fertility.
           * You've had unprotected sex and are worried you may have chlamydia.
           * You've changed sexual partner.

Clamelle home test kit contains
           * Instruction leaflet
           * Test request form
           * Urine sample bottle
           * Transport container
           * Pre-paid pre-addressed padded envelope

Post the urine sample off directly to the designated laboratory. Your result will be available within seven days.

Confidential results

The results of the Clamelle home chlamydia test are completely confidential and will not be passed on to your GP unless you request. You are given a unique reference number (URN) to maintain this confidentiality.

Informing partners
If you have a positive result it is likely that your sexual partner(s) will have it too. Your recent partners should be treated to reduce the spread of infection to others and protect them from the complications of chlamydia.

If you have tested positive for Chlamydia your partner(s) can also get azithromycin from this site.
The participating pharmacist will require you to give your partner(s) a notification of contact before partner(s) can be supplied with treatment direct from the pharmacy.

Negative results
If your test is negative, it means you don't have Chlamydia. However, you may be at risk of other sexually transmitted infections and so it is important that you visit your GUM clinic to be tested for other STIs.

The home test kit does not detect Chlamydia in the mouth or anus.

It takes 2 weeks from infection for a test to become positive. It takes 6 weeks to go negative after successful treatment.

If the result of your test is unclear and is recorded as neither positive or negative, the test should be repeated. This is known as 'an equivocal test result'. If you have an equivocal results you can message the doctor in 'Your Account' section of this website with the details of your result and your URN and we will give you a replacement kit free of charge.



Manufacturers and Brands



* We have been operating in the UK for the last 50 years.
* We employ approximately 90,000 colleagues in 180 countries.
* We have more than 4,000 staff in the UK.
* We spend £550 million on medicine research and development in the UK alone.
* We have four major Research and development sites around the world, including one in Sandwich, Kent.
* Provides medicines taken by 2.7 million Britons every day.


Sandoz is a global generics leader. We save and improve lives by developing, producing and distributing high-quality, affordable pharmaceuticals. Thanks to our global network, Sandoz medicines are now available to 90% of people worldwide. In addition to direct cost savings to patients, we contribute to the stability of healthcare systems worldwide and free up resources for new and innovative medicines.


Teva UK Limited is one of the biggest pharmaceutical companies in the UK. We're proud to be part of the Teva Pharmaceutical Industries group, and we make medicines that help improve lives.


Actavis is one of the world's leading players in the development, manufacture, and sale of first-class generic pharmaceuticals.
Actavis has one of the broadest product portfolios and pipelines in the industry, with over 350 medicines available in the United Kingdom and more than 350 in development.
 
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Azithromycin 250mg (one course of treatment)  - 4 tablets
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